E122: Avoid hard legal lessons with attorney Scott Reib

We’re excited to announce that SEO Brothers and Opteo have partnered with UGURUS as sponsors of our show.

We welcome our first attorney to the show!

Scott Reib formed ReibLaw as a full-service law firm that focuses on developing strong relationships with small businesses with one simple goal in mind – make your legal life easier.

With over 20 years of experience in Business Law and Estate Planning, ReibLaw is out to revolutionize the legal industry.

Listen in to get some simple, straightforward recommendations on business law basics.

Episode highlights:

  • How Scott developed a legal subscription model to support small businesses.
  • How Scott recommends structuring a small, 2- or 4-page contract.
  • Find out the default of who owns the intellectual property in an agency-client relationship.
  • Get advice on how to walk someone through a contract.
  • Find out what writing your initials in contracts is all about.
  • How to have conversations about goals and avoid litigation.
  • How to navigate common legal issues with employees and subcontractors, like former employees soliciting your list.
  • How to make the call: do you cut your losses or go to court?
  • What to do if a client says they’re going to sue you, and what you should have in place before that happens.
  • Run time: 41:56
  • Best advice ever received: I have two ears and one mouth – I’ve learned to listen in meetings and find the moment to look brilliant.
  • Habit that contributes to success: Planning schedule ahead of time.
  • Recommended books: Get a Grip by Gino Wickman and Traction by Gino Wickman
  • Recommended tool: Loom chrome plug-in to make videos explaining contracts


Links:

Quotes:

  • “A lot of contracts are too complicated.”
  • “It’s almost more important to say what the customer’s not getting.”
  • “Make sure…you’re not responsible for them going out of business if the campaigns don’t work.”
  • “Contracts make honest people honest.”
  • “The only thing that matters is what’s in the four corners (of the contract).”
  • “You have to have a war chest.”

Takeaways:

  • Documents: make sure you have the right parties and their legal name.
  • Make sure you’re not guaranteeing success.
  • Make it’s clear who owns the IP.